Category Archives: House of Representatives of the Philippines

THE BUDGET PROCESS & THE PHILIPPINE CONGRESS

Many people, especially students who take higher studies in Public Administration are unaware of the role of Congress in the budget process. In this article, three main topics will be covered under the budget process namely: Budgetary Overview, the Constitutional Provisions and Related Laws in the Budget Process, and the Budget Process.
I. Budgetary Overview
First, we shall define the national budget which is the government’s estimate of its income and expenditures. It is what the government plans to spend for its programs and projects, as well as the sources of funds. The budget process involves budgeting and the budget. Budgeting refers to methods and practices of government planning, adopting and executing financial policies and programs. The budget refers to a plan of expressing in monetary terms the operating program and means of financing of a government for a definite period of time. The national budget is spent for the implementation of various government programs and projects, the operations of government offices such as the payment of salaries, construction of buildings.
II. Dimensions of the Budget
The budget possesses various dimensions. It can be classified according to the following: By Sector, By Cost Structure, By Expense Class and By Object, By Region, By Type of Appropriation.
A. By Sector
The budget contains various type of expenditures. They are for:
1. Social Services Expenditure;
2. Economic Services Expenditure;
3. Defense Expenditure;
4. General Public Services; and
5. Debt Burden
B. By Cost Structure
1. For General Administration & Support Services or Overhead Expenses
2. As Support to Operations for the facilitative functions and services, staff and technical support
3. For Operations of regular activities addressing agency mandate
Example: Production of goods, delivery of pubic services, and regulation, etc.
4. For Projects such as homogenous group of activities that result in the accomplishment of identifiable output within a designated period, whether foreign or locally funded
C. By Expense Class & By Object
1. Current Operating Expenditures for personal services, maintenance and other operative expenses (MOOE)
2. Capital Outlays for investments, loans, livestock and crops, land/land improvements, buildings/structures, furniture/fixtures
D. By Major Recipient of Government
The major recipients of the budget are:
1. The NGAs (National Government Agencies) – they include all agencies with the Executive, Legislative and Judicial Branches of government
2. The LGUs (Local Government Units) – funding is released in the form of IRAs (Internal Revenue Allotments), special shares in national proceeds, credit thru the MDF (municipal development fund), and premium subsidies for local insurance
3. The GOCCs (Government Owned and Controlled Corporations) – funding is though subsidies, equity and net lending
E. By Regional Allocation
The Budget is apportioned for each of the various regions of the country.
F. By Type of Appropriation
The budget is further classified into different types, namely:
1. General Appropriations
2. Supplemental Appropriations
3. Continuing Appropriations
4. Automatic Appropriations
The budget may increase or decrease depending on the government’s policy of how much it will infuse into the economy. Maturing of a country’s debt determines the size of the budget.
III. Sources of Funds for the National Budget
A. Revenues
1. Tax Revenues
2. Non-Tax Revenues such as fees to be collected
B. Borrowings
The government borrows to provide for the requirements of capital projects and to support priority programs and projects. Relying solely on domestic resources will limit government’s capability to provide the needed support. Domestic resources is insufficient to finance priority programs and projects.
C. Obligations Budget vs. Cash Budget
Obligations budget are for expenditures incurred for the year and is to be paid in said year. This can also be for expenditures incurred for the year to be paid next year. Aside from this, it is also allocated for interest payments.
Cash budgets are for expenditures incurred for next year. It can also be allocated for expenditures in previous years, and is also allocated for interest payments.

D. National Government Deficit vs. Consolidated Public Sector Deficit
The National Government Deficit is the shortfall or deficiency in revenues over expenditures due to its operations on a given period, usually one year. A Consolidated Public Sector Deficit covers the combined deficit of the National Government, the restructuring accounts of the Commercial Bank, the major non-financial Government Owned and Controlled Corporations, the Government Financial Institutions, the Local Government Units, the social security institutions such as the Government Service Insurance System & the Social Security System, the Oil Price Stabilization Fund and the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (Central Bank of the Philippines).
E. Constitutional Provisions & Major Laws Affecting the Budget/Budget Process:
1. Philippine Constitution
The Constitutional provisions relative to the budget to wit are:

a. Section 24, Article VI, which states that all appropriations, revenue or tariff bills increase of the public debt, bills of local application and private bills shall originate in the House of Representatives, but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments
b. Section 25 (1), Article VI, states that the [Philippine]Congress may not increase the appropriations recommended by the President for the operation of the government as specified in the budget. The form, content, and manner of preparation of the budget shall be prescribed by law.
c. Section 25 (2), Article VI states that no provision or enactment shall be embraced in the General Appropriations Bill unless it relates specifically to some particular appropriation therein. Any such provision or enactment shall be limited in its operation to the appropriations to which it relates.
d. Section 25 (4), Article VI: “A special appropriations bill shall specify the purpose for which it is intended, and shall be supported by funds actually available as certified by the National Treasurer, or to be raised by a corresponding revenue proposal therein.”
e. Section 25 (5), Article VI: “No law shall be passed authorizing any transfer of appropriations, however, the President [of the Philippines], the President of the [Philippine] Senate, the Speaker of the [Philippine] House of Representatives, the Chief Justice of the [Philippine] Supreme Court, and the Heads of Constitutional Commissions may, by law, be authorized to augment any item in the general appropriations law for their respective e offices from savings in other items of their respective appropriations.”
f. Section 25 (7), Article VI: “If, by the end of the fiscal year, the [Philippine] Congress shall have failed to pass the General Appropriations Bill for the ensuing fiscal year, the General Appropriations Law for the preceding fiscal year shall be deemed re-enacted and shall remain in force and effect until the General Appropriations Bill is passed by [the Philippine] Congress.”
g. Section 22, Article VII: “The President shall submit to the Congress within thirty (30) days from the opening of every regular session, as the basis of the General Appropriations Bill, a budget of receipts and expenditures and sources of financing, including receipts from existing and proposed revenue measures.

2. Book VI of Executive Order No. 292 series 1987, or the Administrative Code of 1987 entitled National Government Budgeting
3. Presidential Decree No. 1177, as amended, or the Budget Reform Decree of 1977, insofar as not superseded by executive Order No. 292 series 1987 or the Administrative Code of 1987
4. Other Applicable Laws
F. The Budget Process
This involves four major steps namely:
1. Budget Preparation
Budget Preparation involves the formulation of estimates of revenues and expenditures by the Executive Departments and Agencies. In preparing the annual budget proposal, the said department makes an estimation of government revenues. It then determines the budget priorities within available revenues and borrowing limits. Finally, it translates these approved priorities into expenditures.

The main agency involved is the Development Budget Coordination Committee (DBCC) composed of the following agencies:

a. The Department of Budget and Management, the agency responsible for resource allocation and management;
b. The Department of Finance, the agency responsible for resource generation and debt management;
c. The National Economic and Development Authority, the agency responsible for overall economic activity;
d. The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (Central Bank of the Philippines), the agency responsible for monetary measures and policies;
e. The Office of the President of the Philippines, the agency responsible for the approval and oversight of the budget

In the preparation of the budget, the DBCC approves the parameters, makes a budget call, conducts budget hearings, makes a budget review then consolidates the budget. It then validates and confirms the budget, which is finally approved by the President of the Philippines and his Cabinet. The President thereby submits the budget to Congress for approval.

2. Budget Legislation/Authorization
a. Overview
This pertains to the whole range of legislative action on the budget, leading to the enactment of a General Appropriations Law for the year. The Philippine House of Representatives first conducts hearings/debates on the budget.

The House then approves the budget, for submission to the Senate of the Philippines. Senate hearings and debates are conducted on the budget, which is finally approved. A Bicameral Conference Committee composed of representatives of the Philippine House of Representatives and the Senate is convened. After approval by the Bicameral Conference Committee, the President enacts the budget which is known as the General Appropriations Act.

b. The Legislative Budget Process
The main unit of the Philippine House of Representatives involved in the budget process is the Committee Affairs Department (CAD) composed of the Standing Committees and Sub-Committees. The CAD’s activities during budget legislation are:

i.Committee Budget Hearings
Standing Committees (sometimes referred to as the Mother Committee/Committee Proper) are responsible for conducting budget hearings. During these hearings, macroeconomic assumptions/plans are presented during the Committee budget hearings on a department wide level. All the heads of the Executive Departments are invited to these hearings.
Sub-Committees are also responsible for conducting these budget hearings. Budget hearings are conducted by the Sub-Committees on an agency by agency level. Bureaus and other offices under the various departments of the national government are invited to these hearings.

ii.Printing of General Appropriations Bill (GAB) on 1st Reading
A National Expenditure Program is formulated, and a copy of the GAB on 1st Reading is printed by the Committee Technical Staff, based on the National Expenditure Program. The GAB is filed in the plenary session for 1st Reading.

iii. Executive Meeting of the Committee
The Committee meets in executive session to discuss and approve proposed committee amendments to the GAB. Committee Reports are prepared and filed to the Bills and Index Division.

iv.Sponsorship and Plenary Deliberations

General principles and macroeconomic assumptions are sponsored and debated in the plenary session. Deliberations on the budgets of each department, agency, office, including Government Owned and Controlled Corporations.

v. Approval on 2nd Reading of the GAB
Turno en contra speeches are delivered on the Floor. The turno en contra is a legislative tradition allowing opponents of a bill an opportunity to explain at length their position, in the same manner that a bill’s sponsor delivers a sponsorship speech. After the Turno en Contra, the Philippine House Members vote on the approval of the GAB on 2nd Reading.

vi.Amendments, Finalization & Printing of the GAB for 3rd Reading
Inclusion of possible amendments to the GAB for 3rd Reading are submitted to the Floor. Amendments are approved for inclusion in the proposed copy of the GAB on 3rd Reading, which is subsequently printed for deliberation.

vii. Approval of the GAB on 3rd Reading
The GAB is distributed to the Philippine House Members who vote on the approval of the bill on 3rd Reading. The GAB is then approved on 3rd Reading.

viii. Transmittal of the 3rd Reading Copy of the GAB to the Philippine Senate

The GAB, as approved on 3rd Reading, is transmitted to the Senate for consideration in a similar manner as deliberated upon by the House.

ix.Bicameral (Bicam for short) Conference Committee

The Conferees or representatives from both the Philippine House and Senate convene as a Conference Committee in order to settle and reconcile differing provisions of each Chamber’s version of the bill.

x. Approval of the Bicam Report
During this stage of the budget process, the Conference Committee Report is ratified by each Chamber.

xi. Finalization and Printing of the Enrolled Copy of the GAB

All amendments as approved in the Committee Report is incorporated into the enrolled copy of the GAB. The enrolled copy is finally printed.

xii. Signing of the Enrolled Copy of the GAB

The enrolled copy of the GAB is forwarded to the President for signing. Veto powers of the President are exercised in the enactment of the GAB. The signed appropriations bill is finally enacted into a law which is termed as the General Appropriations Act.

3. Budget Execution/Implementation

Budget execution covers the allotment of appropriations by the central budget authority to, and the incurrence of obligations by, the spending departments and agencies of government. The steps in the execution of the budget are:
a. Release of the funds by the Department of Budget and Management (DBM)
b. Implementation of the various programs and activities by the different government agencies
i.Involves the formulation of allotment and cash programs
ii.An Agency Budget Matrix (ABM) is prepared
iii.The ABM is validated/Confirmed for correctness and accuracy
iv.The General Allotment Release Order (GARO)/Special Allotment Release Order (SARO)/Notice of Cash Allotment is Released (NCA)
v.Government Programs/Projects/Activities can now be implemented due to fund release

4. Budget Accountability & Review

This involved the reporting of actual performance against plans or targets, and it involves the following process:
a. Monitoring of agency budgetary performance
b. Comparison and evaluation of actual performance with the initially-approved work targets
c. A summary list of checks issued is submitted on a monthly basis
d. Physical & Financial Report of Operations is submitted on a quarterly basis in the form of a trial balance

Related links:
1. Non-URL Source
Presented by the Honorable Rolando G. Andaya Jr., former Chairman,
Committee on Appropriations, 12th Congress, on July 24, 2001 at the
South Committee Rooms A & B, House of Representatives, Batasan
Complex, Quezon City

2. URL Source
a. The 1987 Philippine Constitution

http://www.gov.ph/the-philippine-constitutions/the-1987-constitution-of-the-republic-of-the-philippines/”

b. Book VI, Executive Order No. 292 series 1987 entitled National Government Budgeting

http://www.gov.ph/1987/07/25/executive-order-no-292/

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Budget Process, House of Representatives of the Philippines

Salary Standardization Rates for Philippine Government Employees (Joint Resolution No. 4 by the Philippine Congress)

The year 2012 has already ended and the schedules for the last salary standardization rate should have been increased, subject to certain laws, by the year end. Joint Resolution No. 4, enacted by both houses of Congress states the rates for standardized salaries of Philippine government employees. This was a consolidation of both House Joint Resolution No. 36 and Senate Joint Resolution No. 26 on June 1, 2009 and June 2, 2009, respectively, and was approved by former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on June 17, 2009.

The following table of rates, in Philippine Pesos, are as follows, as stated in Item 4 (b) of said resolution:

Salary Grade  1 :

Step 1 = 9,000; Step 2 = 9,090; Step 3 = 9,181; Step 4 = 9,274;

Step 5 = 9,365; Step 6 = 9,459; Step 7 = 9,554; Step 8 = 9,649

Salary Grade  2 :

Step 1 = 9,675; Step 2 = 9,772; Step 3 = 9,869; Step 4 = 9,968

Step 5 = 10,068; Step 6 =  10,168; Step 7 =  10,270; Step 8 =  10,373

Salary Grade  3 :

Step 1 = 10,401; Step 2 =  10,505; Step 3 =  10,610; Step 4 = 10,716

Step 5 = 10,823; Step 6 =   10,931; Step 7 = 11,040; Step 8 =  11,151

Salary Grade  4 :

Step 1 = 11,181; Step 2 = 11,292; Step 3 = 11,405; Step 4 =  11,519

Step 5 = 11,635; Step 6 = 11,751; Step 7 = 11,869; Step 8 =  11,987

Salary Grade – 5 : Step 1 = 12,019; Step 2 = 12,139; Step 3 = 12,261; Step 4 =  12,383

Step 5 = 12,507; Step 6 = 12,632; Step 7 = 12,759; Step 8 =  12,886

Salary Grade 6 :

Step 1 =  12,921; Step 2 = 13,050; Step 3 = 13,180; Step 4 = 13,312;

Step 5 = 13,445; Step 6 =  13,580; Step 7 = 13,716; Step 8 = 13,853

Salary Grade 7 :

Step 1 =  13,890; Step 2 = 14,029; Step 3 = 14,169; Step 4 = 14,311;

Step 5 = 14,454; Step 6 = 14,598; Step 7 =  14,744; Step 8 = 14,892

Salary Grade 8 :

Step 1 =  14,931; Step 2 =  15,081; Step 3 =  15,232; Step 4 =  14,384;

Step 5 = 15,538; Step 6 = 15,693; Step 7 = 15,850; Step 8 = 16,009

Salary Grade 9 :

Step 1 = 16,051; Step 2 = 16,212; Step 3 = 16,374; Step 4 = 16,538;

Step 5 = 16,703; Step 6 = 16,870; Step 7 = 17,039; Step 8 = 17,209

Salary Grade 10:

Step 1 =17,255; Step 2 = 17,428; Step 3 = 17,602; Step 4 = 17,778;

Step 5 =17,956; Step 6 = 18,135; Step 7 = 18,317; Step 8 = 18,500

Salary Grade 11:

Step 1 = 18,549; Step 2 = 18,735; Step 3 = 18,922; Step 4 = 19,111

Step 5 = 19,302; Step 6 = 19,495; Step 7 = 19,690 Step 8 = 19,887

Salary Grade 12:

Step 1 = 19,940; Step 2 =  20,140; Step 3 = 20,341; Step 4 = 20,545;

Step 5 = 20,750; Step 6 =  20,958; Step 7 = 21,167; Step 8 = 21,379

Salary Grade 13:

Step 1 = 21,436; Step 2 =  21,650; Step 3 = 21,867; Step 4 = 22,086;

Step 5 = 22,306; Step 6 = 22,529; Step 7 = 22,755; Step 8 = 22,982

Salary Grade 14:

Step 1 = 23,044; Step 2 = 23,274; Step 3 = 23,507; Step 4 = 23,742;

Step 5 = 23,979; Step 6 = 24,219; Step 7 = 24,461; Step 8 = 24,706

Salary Grade 15:

Step 1 = 24,887; Step 2 = 25,161; Step 3 =  25,438; Step 4 = 25,718;

Step 5 = 26,286; Step 6 = 26,576; Step 7 = 26,868

Salary Grade 16:

Step 1 = 26,878; Step 2 =  27,174; Step 3 = 27,473; Step 4 = 27,775;

Step 5 = 28,080; Step 6 = 28,389; Step 7 = 28,702; Step 8 = 29,017

Salary Grade 17:

Step 1 = 29,028; Step 2 =  29,348; Step 3 = 29,671; Step 4 = 29,997

Step 5 = 30,327; Step 6 = 30,661; Step 7 = 30,998; Step 8 = 31,339

Salary Grade 18:

Step 1 = 31,351; Step 2 = 31,696; Step 3 = 32,044; Step 4 = 32,397

Step 5 = 32,753; Step 6 = 33,113; Step 7 =  33,478; Step 8 = 33,846

Salary Grade 19:

Step 1 = 33,859; Step 2 = 34,231; Step 3 = 34,608; Step 4 = 34,988;

Step 5 = 35,373; Step 6 = 35,762; Step 7 = 36,156; Step 8 = 13,554

Salary Grade 20:

Step 1 = 36,567; Step 2 = 36,970; Step 3 = 37,376; Step 4 = 37,788

Step 5 = 38,203; Step 6 = 38,623; Step 7 = 39,048; Step 8 = 36,478

Salary Grade 21:

Step 1 = 39,493; Step 2 = 39,927; Step 3 = 40,367; Step 4 = 40,811;

Step 5 = 41,259; Step 6 = 41,713; Step 7 = 42,172; Step 8 = 42,636

Salary Grade 22:

Step 1 = 42,652; Step 2 = 43,121; Step 3 =43,596; Step 4 = 44,075

Step 5 = 44,560; Step 6 = 45,050; Step 7 = 45,546; Step 8 = 6,047

Salary Grade 23:

Step 1 = 46,064; Step 2 = 46,571; Step 3 = 47,083; Step 4 = 47,601;

Step 5 = 48,125; Step 6 = 48,645; Step 7 = 49,190; Step 8 =49,731

Salary Grade 24:

Step 1 = 49,750; Step 2 = 50,297; Step 3 = 50,850; Step 4 = 51,410;

Step 5 = 51,975; Step 6 = 52,547; Step 7 = 53,125; Step 8 = 53,709

Salary Grade 25:

Step 1 = 53,730; Step 2 = 54,321; Step 3 = 54,918; Step 4 = 55,522

Step 5 = 56,133; Step 6 = 56,750; Step 7 = 57,375; Step 8 = 58,006

Salary Grade 26:

Step1 = 58,028; Step 2 = 58,666; Step 3 = 59,312; Step 4 = 59,964;

Step 5 = 60,624; Step 6 = 61,291; Step 7 =  61,965; Step 8 = 62,646

Salary Grade 27:

Step 1 = 62,670; Step 2 = 63,360; Step 3 =  64,057; Step 4 = 64,761;

Step 5 = 65,474; Step 6 = 66,194; Step 7 = 66,922; Step 8 = 67,658

Salary Grade 28:

Step 1 = 67,684; Step 2 = 68,428; Step 3 = 69,181; Step 4 = 69,942;

Step 5 = 70,711; Step 6 = 71,489; Step 7 = 72,276; Step 8 = 73,071

Salary Grade 29:

Step 1 = 73,099; Step 2 =  73,903; Step 3 = 74,716; Step 4 = 75,537;

Step 5 = 76,368; Step 6 = 77,208; Step 7 = 78,058; Step 8 = 78,916

Salary Grade 30:

Step 1 = 78,946; Step 2 =  79,815; Step 3 = 80,693; Step 4 = 81,580;

Step 5 = 82,478; Step 6 = 83,385; Step 7 = 84,302; Step 8 = 85,230

Salary Grade 31:

Step 1 = 90,000; Step 2 = 90,990; Step 3 = 91,991; Step 4 =  93,003;

Step 5 = 94,026; Step 6 =  95,060; Step 7 = 96,106; Step 8 =  97,163

Salary Grade 32:

Step 1 = 103,000; Step 2 = 104,133; Step 3 = 105,278; Step 4 = 106,437;

Step 5 = 107,607; Step 6 =  108,791; Step 7 = 109,988; Step 8 = 111,198

Salary Grade 33:

Step 1 = 120,000

Item 7 (a) states that salary/wage adjustments, if warranted by the finances of the Local Government Units (LGUs), shall be determined on the basis of the income class and financial capability of each LGU, but shall not exceed the following percentages of the rates in the Salary Schedule under Item 4 of this resolution. They are to wit:

For Provinces/Cities:

Special Cities = 100%

1st Class   =  100%

2nd Class =    95%

3rd Class =    90%

4th Class =    85%

5th Class =     80%

6th Class =      75%

For Municipalities

1st Class   =    90%

2nd Class =    85%

3rd Class =    80%

4th Class =    75%

5th Class =    70%

6th Class =    65%

Item 8 states the monthly salary tables for the military and uniformed personnel in Philippine Pesos:

I. Department of National Defense (DND):

Candidate Soldier = 11,265

Private = 14,834

Private First Class = 15,952

Corporal = 16,934

Sergeant = 17,744

Staff Sergeant = 18,665

Technical Sergeant = 20,159

Master Sergeant = 21,771

Senior Master Sergeant = 23,513

Chief Master Sergeant = 25,394

First Chief Master Sergeant = 27,425

Cadet = 27,425

Probationary Second Lieutenant = 27,425

Second Lieutenant = 29,945

First Lieutenant = 32,341

Captain = 35,312

Major = 37,313

Lieutenant Colonel = 40,298

Colonel = 43,521

Brigadier General = 47,002

Major General = 50,763

Lieutenant General = 59,210

General = 67,500

II. Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG):

A. Bureau of Jail Management & Penology (BJMP)/Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP)

Fire/Jail Officer I = 14,834

Fire/Jail Officer II = 16,934

Fire/Jail Officer I = 18,665

Senior Fire/Jail Officer I = 21,771

Senior Fire/Jail Officer II = 23,513

Senior Fire/Jail Officer III = 25,394

Senior Fire/Jail Officer IV = 27,425

Inspector = 32,341

Senior Inspector = 35,312

Chief Inspector = 37,313

Superintendent = 40,298

Senior Superintendent =43,521

Chief Superintendent = 47,002

Director = 50,763

B. Philippine National Police (PNP)/ Philippine Public Safety College (PPSC):

Police Officer I = 14,834

Police Officer II = 16,934

Police Officer III = 18,665

Senior Police Officer I = 21,771

Senior Police Officer II = 23,513

Senior Police Officer III = 25,394

Senior Police Officer IV = 27,425

Cadet = 27,425

Inspector = 32,341

Senior Inspector = 35,312

Chief Inspector = 37,313

Superintendent = 40,298

Senior Superintendent = 43,521

Chief Superintendent = 47,002

Director = 50,763

Deputy Director General = 59,210

Director General = 67,500

III. Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) and National Mapping

Resources Authority (NAMRIA)

Apprentice Seaman/Seaman Third Class = 14,834

Seaman Second Class = 15,952

Seaman First Class = 16,934

Petty Officer III = 17,744

Petty Officer II = 18,665

Petty Officer I = 20,159

Chief Petty Officer = 21,771

Senior Chief Petty Officer = 23,513

Master Chief Petty Officer = 25,394

First Master Chief Petty Officer = 27,425

Ensign = 29,945

Lieutenant Junior Grade = 32,341

Lieutenant Senior Grade = 35,312

Lieutenant Commander = 37,313

Commander = 47,002

Rear Admiral = 50,763

Vice Admiral = 54,824

Admiral 59,210

Funding Sources:

Item 12 states the funding source. For national governments, it shall be charged against appropriations set aside in the General Appropriations Acts for 2009 and the years thereafter, including savings generated by the government units. For Government-Owned and Controlled Corporations (GOCCs) and Government Financial Institutions (GFIs), funding comes from their respective generated funds.

Implementation:

As per Item 13 of said resolution, the implementation shall be at least four (4) years for GOCCs/GFIs/LGUs, depending on its financial capability. The implementation of the salary standardization shall take effect July 1, 2009, for GOCCs/GFIs, and for LGUs the resolution takes effect January 1, 2010.

Related Links:

1. Official Gazette Online Source:

Joint Resolution No. 4 by the Philippine Congress

http://www.gov.ph/2009/06/17/joint-resolution-no-4-3/

Leave a comment

Filed under House of Representatives of the Philippines, Salary Standardization Law

Philippine House of Representatives 105th Anniversary, (Part III, Final Part – Roster of House Officials and Members, 1907 – Present)

Note: Philippine House of Representatives established October 16, 1907

Roster of House of Representatives Officials (1907- Present)

A.    Speakers :

        Sergio S. Osmeña, Sr. (1907 – 1922);

        Manuel A. Roxas (1922 – 1933),

        Quintin B. Paredes (1933 – 1935);

        Gil M. Montilla (1935 – 1938);

        Jose Y. Yulo (1938 – 1941);

        Benigno S. Aquino, Sr. (1943 – 1944);

        Jose C. Zulueta (1945);

        Eugenio P. Perez (1946 – 1953);

        Jose B. Laurel,  Jr. (1954  – 1957);

        Daniel Z. Romualdez (1957 – 1962);

        Cornelio T. Villareal (1962 – 1967);

        Jose B. Laurel, Jr. (1967 – 1971);

        Cornelio T. Villareal (1971 – 1972);

        Querube C. Makalintal (1978 – 1984);

        Nicanor E. Yñiguez (1984 – 1986),

        Ramon V. Mitra, Jr. (1987 – 1992);

        Jose C. De Venecia, Jr. (2001 – 2008);

        Manuel B. Villar, Jr. (1998 – 2000);

        Arnulfo P. Fuentebella (2000 – 2001);

        Feliciano R. Belmonte, Jr. (2001);

        Jose C. De Venecia, Jr. (2001- 2009);

        Prospero C. Nograles (2008 – 2010);

        Feliciano R.  Belmonte, Jr. (2010 – Present)

 

B.    Speakers Pro Tempore :

Antonio de las Alas (1923-1929; 1931-1933);

       Quintin B. Paredes (1929-1930; 1933);

       Jose C. Zulueta (1933-1941);

       Prospero C. Sanidad  (1945-1946);

       Francisco I. Ortega (1946-1949);

       Domingo Veloso (1950-1953);

       Daniel Z. Romualdez (1954-1957);

       Constancio E. Castañeda (1958-1962);

       Salipada K. Pendatun (1962-1967, 1984-1985);

       Jose M. Aldeguer (1967-1972);

       Blah Sinsuat 1978-1984;

       Macacuna Dimaporo (1985-1986);

       Antonio V. Cuenco (1987-1992);

       Raul A. Daza (1992-1995)

 

C.     Deputy Speakers

         Alfredo E. Abueg, Jr. (1998-2000); Eduardo R. Gullas (1998-2000);

         Daisy Avance-Fuentes (1998-2001); Erico B. Aumentado (2000); 

         Agapito S. Aquino (2000-2001);  Gerardo S. Espina (2000-2001);

         Raul M. Gonzalez (2001); Nur C. Jaafar (2001); Carlos M. Padilla (2001);

         Ma. Isabelle G. Climaco (2010-Present); Raul A. Daza (2010-Present);

         Arnulfo P. Fuentebella (2010-Present); Pablo P. Garcia (2010-Present);

         Jesus Crispin C. Remulla (2010-Present); Lorenzo R. Tañada III (2010-Present)

1. Deputy Speakers For Luzon:

    Hernando B. Perez (1995-1998);

    Emilio R. Espinosa, Jr. (2001-2004; 2004-2007);

Benigno S. Aquino III (Central Luzon, 2004-2006);

   Eric D. Singson (Central Luzon, 2006-2007)

2. Deputy Speaker For Visayas: 

     Raul A. Daza (1995-1998); Raul M. Gonzalez (2001-2004);

     Raul V. Del Mar (2004-2007)

3. Deputy Speaker For Mindanao:   

    Simeon A. Datumanong (1995-1998);

    Abdulgani “Gerry” A. Salapuddin  (2001-2004; 2004-2007)

 

D.    Floor Leaders/Majority Floor Leaders/Minority Floor Leaders:

     1. Floor Leaders

         Manuel L. Quezon (1908-1910);

         Alberto Barretto (1910-1912);

         Macario Adriatico (1912-1914);

         Galicano Apacible (1914-1916);

         Rafael Alunan (1916-1922);

         Benigno S. Aquino (1922-1927);

         Manuel C. Briones (1928-1933);

         Pedro Sabido (1933);

         Francisco Varona (1934);

         Jose E. Romero (1934-1938);

         Quintin B. Paredes (1939-1941)

    2. Majority Floor Leaders/Majority Leaders:

      a. Majority Floor Leaders :

          Raul T. Leuterio (1946-1953);

          Arturo M. Tolentino (1954-1957);

          Jose M. Aldeguer (1958-1961);

          Francisco I. Ortega (1962);

          Justiniano S. Montaño (1962-1967);

          Marcelino R. Veloso (1967-1972);

          Jose A. Roño (1978-1986);

          Francisco S. Sumulong, Sr. (1987-1992);

          Ronaldo B. Zamora (1992-1994);

          Rodolfo B. Albano, Jr. (1994-1998);

          Manuel A. Roxas II (1998-2000);

          Eduardo R. Gullas (2000);

          Bellaflor Angara-Castillo (2000-2001);

          Sergio A. F. Apostol (2001);

          Neptali M. Gonzales II (2001-2004);

          Prospero C. Nograles (2004-2007)

     b.Majority Leader : Neptali M. Gonzales II (2010-Present)

     c. Minority Floor Leaders/Minority Leaders:

      i. Minority Floor Leaders :

         Cipriano P. Primicias (1946-1949;

         Jose C. Zulueta (1950-1953);

         Eugenio P. Perez (1954-1957); 

         Ferdinand E. Marcos (1958-19590);

         Cornelio T. Villareal (1960-1962);

         Daniel Z. Romualdez (1962-1965); 

         Jose B. Laurel, Jr. (1965-1967);

         Justiniano S. Montano (1967-1971);

         Ramon V. Mitra (1971-1972); 

         Ramon Felipe, Jr. (1972);

         Hilario G. Davide, Jr. (1978-1984); 

         Jose B. Laurel, Jr. (1985-1986);

         Rodolfo B. Albano (1987-1989); 

         Mohammad Ali B. Dimaporo (1989-1990);

         Salvador H. Escudero III (1990-1992);

         Victor F. Ortega (1992);

         Hernando B. Perez (1992-1995); 

         Ronaldo B. Zamora (1995-1998); 

         Feliciano R. Belmonte, Jr. (1998-2001);

         Agapito S. Aquino (2001);

         Carlos M. Padilla (2001-2004);

         Francis Joseph G. Escudero (2004-2007)

    ii. Minority Leader:

         Edcel C. Lagman (2010-2012);

         Danilo E. Suarez (2012-Present)

 E.    House Members (1907-Present)

Since the members will occupy so much space in this blog, the following URL Website mentions all the Members of the House of Representatives from 1907 to the present.  Click each letter of the alphabet to access the members according to their family names.

http://www.congress.gov.ph/orphil/index.php

 F.     Secretaries/Secretary-General of the House of Representatives:

Julian Gerona  (1907); Gregorio Nieva (1907-1909); Manuel G. Gavieres (Acting Secretary, 1910); Ramon Diokno (1910-1912); Teodoro Kalaw (1912-1916); Rafael Villanueva (1916-1919); Rafael Palma (1919-1922); and 1935-1957); Feliciano Gomez (1923-1925); Ricardo Gonzalez Lloret (1925-1929); Julian Lao (1934); Eulogio Benitez  (1934-1935); Inocencio B. Pareja (1957-1972); Antonio M. De Guzman  (1978-1986); Quirino D. Abad Santos, Jr. (1987-1992); Camilo L. Sabio (1992-1996); Roberto P. Nazareno (1996-2010); Marilyn B. Barua-Yap (2008-Present)

 

G.    Sergeant-At-Arms

Narciso Diokno (1946-1949); Antonio C. Garcia (1949-1953); Narciso Diokno (1953-1961); Simeon D. Salonga (1961-1972); Raoul V. Cauton (1978-1979); Anselmo Avenido, Jr. (1979-1984); Cesar P. Pobre (1984-1986); Serapio P. Taccad (1987-1992); Bayani N. Fabic (1992-2008); Horacio T. Lactao (2008-2010); Nicasio J. Radovan (2010-Present)

 

 

Related Links :

A.    Books

1.     Roster of Philippine Legislators, 1907-1987 published by the (Philippine House of Representatives Congressional Library, published 1989

2.     Assembly of the Nation: A Centennial History of the House of

                       Representatives published by the (Philippine) House of

                       Representatives, published 2007,

                       page 266

                       (Note: Page 266 of this book edited by

                       the Philippine House of Representatives

                       Congressional Library Bureau;

                       official edited version not released)

 

B.    Websites (URL):

1.     Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines

2.     House of Representatives Website

a.     Roster of Members of the Philippine House of Representatives

        (1907 – Present)

http://www.congress.gov.ph/orphil/

b.     All Members of the Philippine House of Representatives

        (1907 – Present, their terms of office)

http://www.congress.gov.ph/orphil/index.php

C.     Organization – Congressional Library Bureau, House of Representatives

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under House Deputy Speakers, House Majority Floor Leaders and Majority Leaders, House Members, House Minority Floor Leaders and Minority Leaders, House of Representatives of the Philippines, House Secretaries and Secretary-Generals, House Sergeant-at-Arms, House Speakers, Sergeant-at-Arms

Philippine House of Representatives 105th Anniversary, (Part II – Legislative Summary)

House of Representatives : A Legislative Summary (1907 – Present)

 

Note: Philippine House of Representatives established October 16, 1907

 

Legislative Body Legislative Period Laws Enacted Remarks
(See Notes below)
From To
Philippine Commission  September 1, 1900 August 31, 1902 ACT Numbers 1 – 449 1
Philippine Commission September 1, 1902  August 31, 1903 ACT Numbers 450 – 862 1
Philippine Commission September 1, 1903  August 31, 1904 ACT Numbers 863 – 1225 1
Philippine Commission September 1, 1904 August 31, 1905 ACT Numbers 1226 – 1383 1
Philippine Commission September 1, 1905  August 31, 1906 ACT Numbers 1384 – 1536 1
Philippine Commission September 1, 1906  October 15, 1907 ACT Numbers 1537 – 1800 1
1st Philippine Legislature October 16, 1907  May 20, 1909 ACT Numbers 1801 – 1970 1
2nd Philippine Legislature March 28, 1910  February 6, 1912 ACT Numbers 1971 – 2191 1
3rd Philippine Legislature October 16, 1912 February 24, 1915 ACT Numbers 2192 – 2664 1
4th Philippine Legislature October 16, 1916  March 8, 1919 ACT Numbers 2665 – 2868 2

5th Philippine Legislature July 21, 1919  March 14, 1922 ACT Numbers 2869 – 3059 2
 
6th Philippine Legislature October 27, 1922 February 8, 1925 ACT Numbers 3060 – 3220 2
7th Philippine Legislature July 16, 1925 November 9, 1927 ACT Numbers 3221 – 3430 2
8th Philippine Legislature July 16, 1928 November 7, 1930 ACT Numbers 3431 – 3822 2
9th Philippine Legislature July 16, 1931 May 5, 1934 ACT Numbers 3823 – 4126 2
10th Philippine Legislature July 16, 1934 November 21, 1935 ACT Numbers4127 – 4275 2
1st National Assembly (Commonwealth Period) November 25, 1935   August 15, 1938 Common-wealth Act Numbers 1 – 415 3
2ndNational Assembly (Commonwealth Period) January 24, 1939 December 16, 1941 Common-wealth Act Numbers 416 – 729 3
National Assembly (Japanese Regime) October 18, 1943 February 2, 1944 No Laws Enacted 4
1st Congress of the Commonwealth June 9, 1945 December 20, 1945 No Laws Enacted 5
2nd Congress of the Commonwealth (Liberation Period) May 25, 1946 July 3, 1946 No Laws Enacted 6
1st Congress of the Republic July 5, 1946 December 13, 1949 Republic Act Numbers 1 – 421 7
2nd Congress of the Republic December 30, 1949 December 18, 1953 Republic Act Numbers 422 – 972 7
3rd Congress of the Republic January 25, 1954 December 10, 1957 Republic Act Numbers 973 – 2049 7
4th Congress of the Republic January 27, 1958 December 13, 1964 Republic Act Numbers 2050 – 3450 7
5th Congress of the Republic January 22, 1962 December 17, 1965 Republic Act Numbers 3451 – 4642 7
6th Congress of the Republic January 17, 1966 June 17, 1969 Republic Act Numbers 4643 – 6123 7
7th Congress of the Republic January 26, 1970 September 23, 1972 Republic Act Numbers 6124 – 6635 7
Interim Batasang Pambansa June 12, 1978 June 5, 1984 Batas Pambansa Bilang 1-865 8
Batasang Pambansa July 23, 1984 March 25, 1986 Batas Pambansa Bilang 866 – 889 9
8th Congress of the Republic July 27, 1987 June 22, 1992 Republic Act Numbers 6636 – 7635 10
9th Congress of the Republic July 27, 1992 May 26, 1995 Republic Act Numbers 7636 – 8171 10
10th Congress of the Republic July 24, 1995 February 20, 1998 Republic Act Numbers 8172 – 8744 10
11th Congress of the Republic July 27, 1998 May 30, 2001 Republic Act Numbers 8745 – 9159 10
12th Congress of the Republic July 23, 2001 May 28, 2004 Republic Act Numbers 9160 – 9332 10
13th Congress of the Republic July 26, 2004 July 24, 2006 Republic Act Numbers 9333 – 9495 10
14th Congress of the Republic July 23, 2007 June 9, 2010 Republic Act Numbers 9496 – 10146 10
15th Congress of the Republic July 26, 2010 Present Republic Act Numbers 10147 – 10184 (as of October 18, 2012) 10

Notes:

1    Cooper Act of July 1, 1902 popularly known as the Philippine

Bill of 1902

2    Cooper Act of July 1, 1902 popularly known as the Philippine

Bill of 1902; Philippine Autonomy Act, or the Jones Act,

enacted on August 29, 1916

3    The Philippine Independence Act or Tydings-

McDuffie Law (U. S. Public Law 73-12724 March

1934)

4    1943 Constitution

5    All 5 Special Sessions Convened; no regular session

6    Convening of Pre-War Legislators elected during

November 1941

7    National Assembly Resolution No. 73 dated April 11, 1940

(Constitutional Amendments); Article VI, Section 9, 1935

Philippine Constitution; Republic Act No. 6

8   Article VIII,  Section 6, 1973 Philippine Constitution

9   Article VIII, Section 6,1973 Philippine Constitution;

President Corazon C. Aquino issued Proclamation No.

3 on March 25, 1986 abolishing the Batasang

Pambansa

10 Article VI, Section 15, 1987 Philippine

Constitution

Total Laws Enacted by:

1. The Philippine Commission (1900-1907)

= 1,800 laws

2. The Philippine Legislature (1907-1935)

= 2,475 laws

3. National Assembly, Commonwealth Period (1935- 1941)

= 729 laws

4. Interim Batasang Pambansa (1978-1984)

= 865 laws

5. Regular Batasang Pambansa, (1984-1986)

= 24 laws

6. Congress of the Republic (1946-1972; 1987-Present)

= 10,184 laws

Total Laws enacted, as of October 24, 2012

= 16, 081 laws

Related Links :

A.    Philippine Laws

1.     Philippine Constitution (Official Gazette URL & Non-URL Website)

a.     1935

http://www.gov.ph/the-philippine-constitutions/1935-constitution-ammended/

b.     1943

http://www.gov.ph/the-1943-constitution/

c.     1973

http://www.gov.ph/the-philippine-constitutions/1973-constitution-of-the-republic-of-the-philippines-2/

d.      1987

http://www.gov.ph/the-philippine-constitutions/the-1987-constitution-of-the-republic-of-the-philippines/

2.     Republic Acts

a.     Republic Act No. 6

        Official Gazette, volume  42, no. 8,

        page 1794

        (Issue date: August 1946)

3.     Presidential Proclamations

a.     Proclamation No. 1081 (1972 Imposition of Martial Law; Online Official Gazette)

http://www.gov.ph/1972/09/21/proclamation-no-1081/

b.     Proclamation No. 3 series 1986

        Official Gazette volume 82, no. 13,

         page 1567

         (Issue date: March 31, 1986)

B. United States Laws (URL Website)

1.  Cooper Act or Philippine Bill of 1902

http://www.chanrobles.com/philippinebillof1902.htm

2.  Jones Law or Philippine Autonomy Act of 1916

http://www.chanrobles.com/joneslaw.htm

3.     Public Law (of the U. S. Congress) 73-127

popularly known as The Tydings-McDuffie Law

or The Philippine Independence Act

http://www.philippine-history.org/tydings-mcduffie-law.htm

C. House of Representatives indexes, off-line and on-line indexes

      1.  Compendium of Philippine Laws, volumes 1 and 2,

           published by the Congressional Library Bureau,

           (Philippine House of Representatives), 1989

      2. House of Representatives Website          

      a. Roster of Members of the House of Representatives

              (1907 – Present)

http://www.congress.gov.ph.orphil/

      b. All Members of the Philippine House of Representatives

              (1907 – Present, their terms of office)

http://www.congress.gov.ph/orphil/index.php

D. Organizations

     Congressional Library Bureau,  

     House of Representatives of the Philippines

E. Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines

Comments Off on Philippine House of Representatives 105th Anniversary, (Part II – Legislative Summary)

Filed under 1907 - 1935 Philippine Legislature, 1935 - 1941 National Assembly of the Commonwealth Period, 1943-1944 National Assembly of the Japanese Regime, 1945-1946 Congress of the Commonwealth, 1946 - 1972 Congress of the Republic, 1978 - 1986 Interim and Regular Batasang Pambansa, 1987-Present Congress of the Republic, ACTS of the Philippine Commission, Batas Pambasa, Commonwealth Acts, Constitution of the Philippines, House of Representatives of the Philippines, Laws, Legislative Bodies, Legislative Bodies of the Philippine Congress, Legislative Period, Philippine Independence Act of 1934, Philippine Organic Act of 1902, Republic Acts, Sergeant-at-Arms, Tydings-McDuffie Law

Philippine House of Representatives 105th Anniversary, (Part I – Trivia)

October 16, 1907 marks the establishment of the Philippine House of Representatives.  Its legal basis is the Philippine Organic Act, approved on July 1, 1902.  This is popularly known as the Philippine Bill of 1902, and sometimes known as the Cooper Act, after the U. S. Legislator Henry A. Cooper.  The law establishes the Philippine Assembly which eventually became the House of Representatives.  Below is the title of the enacted law:

“AN ACT TEMPORARILY TO PROVIDE FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE AFFAIRS OF CIVIL GOVERNMENT IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES”

                                          –57th Congress of the United States of America, First Session, 1902

The following is a summary of significant information on the Lower House of Congress :

House of Representatives Trivia

I. Gender:  First Woman Legislator- Elisa R. Ochoa

                     (National Assembly, Japanese Regime

                      who represented Agusan Province)

Note: The Philippines was under the Japanese

              Rule at that time

 II. House Members Who Were Elected and Died Thereafter Before Assuming Office :

A.   Salud Vivero Parreño (7th Congress of the Republic)

B.   Percival B. Catane  (11th  Congress of the Republic)

III. Legislative Period:  

A. Shortest Legislative Period  – 2nd Congress of the Commonwealth

     (One month and 9 days, 05/25/1946 to 07/03/1946)

B. Longest Legislative Period – 8th Congress of the Republic

     (4 years, 5 months and 22 days, 07/27/1987 to 06/22/1992)

IV. Philippine Presidents

A.  Who Were Former House Members:

1.   Manuel L. Quezon (1st Philippine Legislature, 1907-1909)

2.   Sergio Osmeña  (1st –  5th Philippine Legislature, 1907-1922)

3.   Elpidio Quirino (5th Philippine Legislature, 1919-1922)

4.   Manuel A. Roxas (6th to 10th Philippine Legislature, 1922-1935,

       1st National Assembly, 1935-1938)                  

5.   Carlos P. Garcia (7th Philippine Legislature, 1925-1927;

       8th Philippine Legislature, 1928-1930)

6.  Ramon Magsaysay Sr. (2nd Congress of the Commonwealth, 1946;

      1st Congress of the Republic, 1946-1949; 2nd Congress of the

       Republic, 1950)

10. Diosdado Macapagal (2nd Congress of the Republic, 1950-1953; 3rd

       Congress of the Republic, 1954-1957)

11.Ferdinand E. Marcos (2nd Congress of the Republic, 1950-1953;

     3rd Congress of the Republic,1954-1957;  4th Congress of the Republic,

     1958-1959; Interim Batasang Pambansa, 1978-1984;  Regular Batasang

     Pambansa, President, 1984-1986 (the President was member of the Batasang

     Pambansa)  

12.Benigno C. Aquino III (12th Congress of the Republic, 2001-2004)

 B.    Who Were Elected House Members After the Presidency

         Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (15th Congress of the Republic, 2010- Present)

 

V. Provinces with No Representative during a Particular Legislative Period:

A.     Cagayan Province,  5th Philippine Legislature 

         – Bonifacio Cortez election declared null and void

B.     Sarangani Province, 10th Congress of the Republic  

         –  Juan Domino election declared null and void

 VI.    Speakership

A.    Speakers :

1.     First Speaker from Mindanao:

        Prospero C. Nograles  –  (14th Congress of the Republic, 2008-2010)

2.    Speaker with the Longest Term of Office

       Sergio Osmeña  (1st – 5th Philippine Legislature, 1907-1922)

3.    Speaker with the Shortest Term of Office: Arnulfo P. Fuentebella

       (11th Congress of the Republic, 2000-2001)

 B.    Deputy Speakers

1.     First Deputy Speakers

a.     Alfredo E. Abueg, Jr. (1998-2000);

b.     Eduardo R. Gullas (1998-2000)

c.      Daisy Avance-Fuentes (1998-2001)

2.     First Deputy Speakers with Major Regional Representation :

a.     From Luzon : Hernando B. Perez (1995-1998)

b.     From the Visayas: Raul A. Daza (1995-1998)

c.      From Mindanao : Simeon A. Datumanong (1995-1998)

C.     Floor Leaders:

1.     First Floor Leader:  Manuel L. Quezon (1908-1910)

2.     First Majority Floor Leader: Raul T. Leuterio (1946-1953)

3.     First Minority Floor Leader: Cipriano P. Primicias (1946-1949)

 

VII. Secretaries

A.    First Woman Appointed as Secretary-General :

        Marilyn B. Barua-Yap

        (14th Congress of the Republic, 2008-2010,

          15th Congress of the Republic, 2010-Present)

B.     House Secretary/Secretary Generals Elected from among

            the House Members:  

1.     Gregorio Nieva (1907-1909)

2.     Manuel G. Gavieres (Acting Secretary, 1910)

3.     Ramon Diokno (1910-1912)

4.      Teodoro Kalaw (1912- 1916)

5.      Rafael Villanueva (1916-1919)

6.      Rafael Palma (1919-1922); and 1935-1957)

7.      Feliciano Gomez (1923-1925)

8.      Ricardo Gonzalez Lloret (1925-1929)

9.     Eulogio Benitez  (1934-1935)  

B.     Secretary/Secretary General with the Longest Term of Office:

Narciso Pimentel, 27 years(Acting Secretary, 1922-1923;

        Secretary, 1929-1933 and 1935-1957)

10.  First Designated Secretary-General:

        Antonio M. De Guzman (Regular Batasang Pambansa)

VIII. Sergeant-at-Arms:

First Sergeant-at-ArmsNarciso Diokno (1946-1949)

 

 IX.Floor Leaders/Minority Floor Leaders/Majority Floor Leaders/

Minority Leaders/Majority Leaders  Who Became House Speakers:

1.    Benigno S. Aquino

2.   Quintin B. Paredes 

3.   Prospero C. Nograles

 

X. House Members:

A.    Three-Generation House of Representatives Legislators

(Direct Descendants):

1.     Aguilar Family: Filemon C. Aguilar, daughter Cynthia A.Villar,

        son Mark A. Villar

2.    Antonino Family: Gaudencio Antonino, son Adelbert Antonino,

        granddaughter, Darlene Antonino-Custodio

3.     Cojuangco Family  : Melecio Cojuangco, son Jose Cojuangco,

        grandson Jose S. Cojuangco, Jr.  

4.    Laurel Family : Jose P. Laurel, son Jose B. Laurel, Jr.,

        grandchildren Jose Macario Laurel IV and Milagros Laurel-Trinidad

5.    Macapagal Family : Diosdado Macapagal, daughter

Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, grandsons Juan Miguel Macapagal-Arroyo

       and Diosdado Ignacio M. Arroyo  

6.   Mitra Family : Ramon P. Mitra, son Ramon V. Mitra, Jr.,

       grandson Abraham Khalil B. Mitra

7.   Marcos Family : Mariano Marcos, son Ferdinand E. Marcos,

       granddaughter Imee R. Marcos

8.   Ponce Enrile Family : Alfonso Ponce Enrile, son Juan Ponce

Enrile, grandson  Juan C. Ponce Enrile, Jr.

9.  Roxas Family : Manuel A. Roxas, son Gerardo M. Roxas,

      grandsons Gerardo A. Roxas Jr. and Manuel A. Roxas II

10.Recto Family : Claro M. Recto, son Rafael R. Recto,

     grandson Rafael G. Recto

B. Four-Generation House of Representatives Legislators

(Direct Descendants)

1.  Fuentebella Family  :  Jose Fuentebella, son Felix A. Fuentebella,

     grandson Arnulfo P. Fuentebella, great grandson

     Felix William B. Fuentebella

C. Husband-Wife-Son/Daughter House Legislators:  

1.  Antonino Family : Gaudencio Antonino, wife Magnolia Antonino,

     son Adelbert Antonino

2.  Gonzalez Family : Raul M. Gonzalez, wife Pacita T. Gonzalez,

      son Raul T. Gonzalez, Jr. 

3.  Marcos Family : Ferdinand E. Marcos, wife Imelda R. Marcos

     daughter Imee R. Marcos

4.  Villar Family : Manuel B. Villar, Jr., wife Cynthia A. Villar,

      son Mark A. Villar

5.  Villareal Family : Cornelio T. Villareal, wife Julita Lorenzo-Villareal,

      son Raul L. Villareal

 D.    House Member Who Sat for Only One Session Date :

Former Representative Noel Cariño of Pasig City during the 12th

Congress of the Republic who won against Henry P. Lanot on 1/22/2004

and sat during Sine die 6/11/2004

 

Related Links

A.    Books

1.     Roster of Philippine Legislators, 1907-1987,  

        published by the (Philippine) House of Representatives

        Congressional Library, 1989

2.     Assembly of the Nation: A Centennial History of the

House of Representatives, published by the (Philippine)

        House of Representatives, 2007, page 266

        (Note: Page 266 of this book edited by the Philippine House of

        Representatives Congressional Library Bureau; official edited

        version not released)

3.     Batasang Pambansa (Interim) Official Directory,

         published by the Public Relations Service, 1979

4.     Official Directory: Regular Batasan, 1984 – 1986

         (Note: this directory was not officially published due

         to its being overtaken by the February 1986 People’s

         Power Revolution; compiled by the Editorial Board

         of the Batasang Pambansa composed of Deputy Secretary General

         Alfredo E. D. Gallardo, Jr., Public Relations Board Director Romeo

         T. Hernandez and Batasan Employee Lourdes Sevilla)

 B.    Websites (URL):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine Organic_Act_%281902%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines

http://www.congress.gov.ph/orphil/

C.     Organization – Congressional Library Bureau,

         House of Representatives

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Cooper Act, House Deputy Speakers, House Floor Leaders, House Majority Floor Leaders and Majority Leaders, House Members, House Minority Floor Leaders and Minority Leaders, House of Representatives of the Philippines, House Secretaries and Secretary-Generals, House Trivia, Philippine Bill of 1902, Philippine Organic Act of 1902, Sergeant-at-Arms